Academics

 

Curriculum:

The semester’s multidisciplinary curriculum is taught as an integrated whole: lectures, seminars, discussions, studio explorations, and job-site work are designed to reinforce and complement one another while informing the group design/build project. Students work together in a collaborative environment with the project as the focal point. The classroom is much like a professional studio or jobsite, except that the instructors-—as mentors—are there to facilitate the student’s creative vision.

Students are enrolled in 15 credits per semester, granted through University of Massachusetts Amherst’s department of Continuing and Professional Education.  Please contact us for questions regarding transferability of credit.

The course descriptions below are intended to help students, faculty, and registrars translate the program into discrete course credits at their home institutions. Download 2015 Syllabi.

The 2016 syllabus is subject to change.

ARCH 497A: Building Science for Cold Climates (3 credits):

The objective of this course is to develop the understanding of basic principles of building physics, material science, and appropriate technology for a New England climate. Through lectures, readings, class discussions, and assignments students will gain comprehension of building anatomy. They will understand how natural forces, particular to a northeast climate can affect a buildings structural and thermal performance. Through individual research, leaning heavily on sourcing and reading white papers from specialists in the field of building science, students will form opinions and present findings on best practices and relate those findings to sociopolitical and economic factors of accessibility. Guest lectures will introduce students to current sustainable technologies, and students will have the opportunity to experiment through applied material research.

ARCH 497B: Defining Metrics for Sustainability (3 credits):

This course is an inter-disciplinary seminar designed to allow students to explore the emerging definitions of “sustainability.” Students will be exposed to and required to discuss current theories, methodologies, and best practices related to the creation of our built environments. Topics for consideration may include but are not limited to human health, community engagement, building performance, ecological impact, human relationships to nature, material life cycle, material spirit, affordability, appropriate technology, beauty, ethics, and utility. Students will grapple with these topics as they develop an appreciation of multiple perspectives; including various stakeholders like developers, designers, builders, and clients. Using a case-study approach, readings, discussions, and lectures students will develop and defend various positions, ultimately defining for themselves metrics for how to define the sustainable building movement, beyond just the greening of conventional affordable buildings into the territory of regenerative design and development.

ARCH 497C & 497D: Design & Visual Communications Studio (6 credits):

This two-part course will investigate ideas of architectural design process and visual representation through a studio format. We will begin by reading Michael Pollan's book "A Place of My Own", using his autobiographical account as a launch pad to explore ideas of shelter. Students will then research and present on various leaders of innovation in the design world and important precedent works, taking note to account for the particular methodological approaches that produced noteworthy outcomes. Drawing from these precedents students will examine various methods for generating a concept, effectively communicating that concept through drawing. Subsequently students will reflect on the outcome a drawing may produce when lifted from the page, or screen, into a fully realized form. Through field trips, additional readings in design theory and phenomenology, and individual research, students will begin to apply these lessons learned to a final semester project. Development of presentation and critical thinking skills will be essential as students will themselves grapple with developing a project all the while addressing key environmental and cultural influences necessary to realize a successful work of architecture. Students will leave with a fundamental understanding of how social, political, performative, and economic factors impact design choices. Particular emphasis will be placed on the process of collaborating as a group, including a variety of perspectives and conceptual approaches, and incorporating the ongoing building process. Students will present their designs for interim and final reviews and will incorporate feedback in an ongoing iterative learning process.

ARCH 497V: History and Theory of Design/Build (3 credits):

This course will explore the different models of project development, management, and delivery through an examination of New England’s regional architecture from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries through contemporary practice with a focus on the Vermont Design/Build movement of the late 60’s and 70’s.  This course will incorporate guest lectures, field trips, and readings with a goal of applying knowledge in vernacular response, resource allocation, and project management to the program’s current and students’ future projects.  Particular attention will be paid to developing, evaluating, and maintaining an internal framework for communication, decision-making, and self- and peer-evaluation.  Additional emphasis will be placed on social, cultural, and economic factors and their changing effects on the built environment and its perception and effect.

Calendar:

The Fall 2016 Semester in Sustainable Design/Build will run from Saturday, August 13 to Friday, December 9. We break classes for Labor Day, Thanksgiving (2 days), and a 2-day Fall Break.

2016 Faculty:

Our faculty are well-respected leaders in their fields. They have honed their skills as instructors in tandem with their professional development. They are practitioners as well as theorists. Their teaching abilities are evidenced by the consistently high praise they receive from their students.

Eric CookEric Cook, Director of Semester Programs, Design/Build Faculty
MArch, University of Utah; MA, University of Utah; BA, Colby College

Eric comes to Yestermorrow from Salt Lake City, Utah where he worked in the design/build arena as both an educator and professional. His love for the design/build process was formally cultivated in a graduate program at the University of Utah but had been kindling in woods and lakes across the country for years. He brings a reverence for precision and planning, technology, and modeling, yet embraces the urgent plunge into execution and craft. Eric looks on the art of small-scale design/build as the perfect pairing of the human condition of intellect and action with our basic questions of shelter, comfort, repose, and community.

 

Vincent RoblesJesse Cooper Design/Build Faculty
BA Middlebury College

Jesse Cooper is a woodworker, designer and carpenter based in Central Vermont. His practice is influenced by his background in sculpture. He specializes in residential and small commercial cabinetry and custom furniture pieces. He also collaborates with artists and performers on set design and construction.

 

 


Jacob Mushlin Design/Build Faculty

Jacob is a builder, designer, and teacher. He’s the owner/founder of Measure Twice: Carpentry, Contracting and Consulting, which focuses on people-centric architecture and unusual endeavors. Jacob has taught with various universities and alternative education programs. His educational background started in architecture and continued in the visual arts, all the while working as a laborer and carpenter’s assistant in the trades.  Since school, he has worked in historic restoration, high performance residential home design, and construction, and community-centric public interest projects.  He lives in Burlington, VT where he enjoys road biking, x-country skiing, playing music, and the sorts of conversations that happen while sitting on the kitchen floor.